First Internet Edition
© Margaret W. Wong
All Rights Reserved, 2012

Publisher
Six Generations Publishing, 2012

PAGE

1
 
 ►
2

 ►
3

 ►
4
 
 ►
5
 
 ►
6


7

8

9

ALL

The Immigrant's Way
For All Immigrants, By An Immigrant
Margaret W. Wong, Esq.

Call now 216-566-9908

Preface ................................................................................................................ 6
Dedication ........................................................................................................... 7
Alien ..................................................................................................................... 8
Acknowledgements ............................................................................................ 9
Prologue ............................................................................................................ 10
Introduction ........................................................................................................ 19
● The American Dream ...................................................................................... 23
● Money Talks .......................................................................................................27
● Do More Foreign Borns Compromise Safety for the US? .......................... 30
● Being Foreign-Born in America ..................................................................... 32

SECTION I: HISTORY OF IMMIGRATION AND IMMIGRATION LAW
 
1. Timeline of American Immigration History ............................................. 54
 
2. Pre-Republic .................................................................................................. 63
       a. Ancient Discovery
       b. European Discovery 1492
       c. Spanish
       d. Huguenots (French Protestants)
       e. English and Scottish
       f. French
       g. Pennsylvania Dutch and Quakers
       h. Dutch
       i. Slaves

3. Independence, 1776 ..................................................................................... 81
 
4.Building the New American Frontier (ca. 1821-1880) ........................... 83
       a. Irish
       b. Chinese
       c. Germans
       d. Scandinavians
       e. Norwegians
       f. Swedes
       g. Danes
       h. Finns

5. The Immigrant Nation (ca. 1881-1913) ..................................................... 94
       a. Italians
       b. Greeks
       c. Hungarians
       d. Ukrainians
       e. Poles
       f. Jews of Eastern Europe and Russia
       g. Japanese and Filipinos
       h. Mexicans
       i. French Canadians

6. World War I, 1914 ........................................................................................ 112
 
7. The Great Depression, 1929 .................................................................... 117
 
8. World War II, 1939 ....................................................................................... 119
 
9. Post-World War II (1945 onwards) ......................................................... 122
       a. Refugees
       b.The Bracero Program and Illegal Immigration
 
10. Immigration and Reform During the Cold War 1945 to 1980 ........ 126
       a. Arabs
       b. Asian Indians
       c. Central Americans
       d. Communist China
       e. Cubans
       f. Dominicans
       g. Haitians
       h. Jamaicans
       i. Koreans
       j. Puerto Ricans
       k. South Americans
       l. The American Civil Rights Movement
       m. Vietnamese
       n. African Immigrants

SECTION II: IMMIGRATION PAPERWORK AND LEGAL PROCESS

1. Immigration Law Changes 1980 to Present ........................................ 150
 
2. 66 Points to Remember ............................................................................ 155

3. Non-immigrant Visas ................................................................................. 171
       a. General
       b. Visa waiver Countries
       c. Other Non-immigrant visa categories
       d. student visas
       e. work permits
       f. H-lB
       g. E-3
       h. TN
       i. NIV Quotas

4.Temporary Protected Status and Deferred Enforced Departure .... 186
 
5. Green Cards ................................................................................................ 187
       a. General
       b. Five Ways to Get a Green Card

6. Green Card Processing Scenarios (including 245(i)) ....................... 238
 
7. U.S. Citizenship .......................................................................................... 252

8. Illegal EntrylLosing Status, Detention, and Deportation ................. 258
       a. Deportation v. Removal
       b. Criminal Trouble
       c. Students losing status
       d. Voluntary Departure 
       e.Taking Your Case to Court
       f. Final Orders of Deportation
       g. Detention
       h. Real ID Act

9. Other issues concerning foreign borns in this country ................... 267
       a. Child Status Protection Act
       b. Crimes and moral turpitude
       c. Media Influences
       d. Cultural Clash: Different skin color
       e. English speaking ability
       f. Educating the next generation
       g. Incarceration and Deportation 
       h. Other Problems With the Immigration System
       i. Do's and Don'ts for Foreign Borns
       j.Important Changes in Immigration Laws for the 1980's
       k. Filing Tips

10. List of Acronyms/Abbreviations .......................................................... 281
 
11. Glossary and explanations ................................................................... 282

12. Resources ................................................................................................. 285
 
●    Works cited ................................................................................................. 286
●   
Contact Information .................................................................................... 300


 

►►► NEXT PAGE - PREFACE ►►►

IMPORTANT NOTICE:

This book is not intended to provide legal advice to any person. Each immigration situation, immigration administrative action, litigation in immigration court or federal action can be different and you may wish to consult with an immigration lawyer concerning specific issues in your particular case. This book provides an overview of common scenarios encountered by immigrants with practical pointers on how to tackle those situations but in no way are these to be construed as legal advice to any person. Nothing in this book should be taken as a substitute for the services of qualified legal counsel.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

aaaaaaaaaaaaiii